Schedule Overview

Residents Review Course Full Program – Wednesday January 13 to Sunday January 17 (All Times Eastern Time Zone) 
Scroll down to view the Hematological Pathology Program

2021-01-13

2021-01-14

2021-01-15

2021-01-16

2021-01-17


Hematological Pathology Program – Friday January 15 – Sunday January 17

2021-01-15

Friday
1010-1055 Quality Assurance in Immunohistochemistry – Dr. Kelly Dakin Hache
1055-1210 Quality Assurance in Hematological Pathology- Dr. Mahboubeh Rahmani
1210-1310 BREAK
1310-1410 HemPath Slide Quiz – Dr. Allam Shawwa
1410-1420 BREAK
1420-1550 Approach In Blood Transfusion – Dr. Hakan Buyukdere
1550-1600 BREAK 
1600-1715  Application of Molecular Pathology in Solid and Liquid Tumours – Dr. Stephen Yip
1715-1755 Quality Assurance In Transfusion Medicine – Dr. Hakan Buyukdere

2021-01-16

Saturday
1000-1100 An Approach to Hemoglobinopathy Investigations – Dr. Tish O’Rielly 
1100-1120 Approach to the Hematological Pathology Fellowship Examination – Dr. Clinton Campbell
1120-1230 The Standardized Bone Marrow Examination: Pearls For Senior Residents In Transition To Practice – Dr. Clinton Campbell 
1230-1330 BREAK
1330-1445 Molecular diagnostics as applies to the current practice of Hematopathology and transition from residency – Dr. Philip Berardi
1445- 1500 BREAK
1500-1600 Selected Topics in Coagulation – Dr. Thomas Covello 
1600-1700 Laboratory Testing in VWD and Platelet Disorders – Dr. Thomas Covello 
1700-1715 BREAK
1715-1815 Approach to Pediatric Hematopathology Pathology – Dr. Audi Setiadi 

2021-01-17

Sunday
1000-1045 Practical Approach to Hematological Evaluation of Peripheral Blood – Dr. Allam Shawwa
1045-1145 Flow Cytometry in the Evaluation of Hematopoiesis and Hematological Neoplasms – Dr. Graeme Quest
1145 -1300 Lunch Seminar – Dr. Brian Cummings 
1300-1415  Approach to Work-up and Diagnosis of Lymphoproliferative Disorders – Dr. Etienne Mahe
1415-1430 BREAK
1430-1530 Coagulopathy – Dr. Rita Selby 
1530-1630 Transfusion rx – Dr. Christine Cserti-Gazdewich 
1630-1640 Closing Remarks

Session Descriptions

The RCPSC GP Exam – Format, General Information and How to Perform at Your Best

Wednesday January 13, 1000-1030

Linda Kocovski

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between preanalytical, analytical and post-analytical error
  • Have a framework for structuring answers
  • Have a basic understanding of laboratory resource utilization and validation

An overview of the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors that can be inherent within erroneous test results. A brief overview of equipment acquisition, validation and maintenance.

A brief review of issues in laboratory utilization.

Diabetes/Cardiac Markers/Toxicology/Lab Safety

Wednesday January 13, 1030-1130

Dr. Zaiping Liu

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the biochemical tests in the screening, diagnosis and management of Diabetes Mellitus
  • Appreciate the biochemical markers of cardiac injury and the methods of testing
  • Learn the basic principles of clinical toxicology tests
  • Understand a list of safety issues in a clinical chemistry laboratory

The session covers several high yield topics in medical biochemistry. The target audience would be general pathology residents who are through the biochemistry rotations and prior writing the Royal college exams. The session will be of value to all pathology residents or practicing pathologists who are setting their career goal as a general laboratory physician or medical laboratory director in community hospitals in the future.

Practical Laboratory Medicine, Errors, Utilization and Validation of Tests Review

Wednesday January 13, 1130-1245

Robbie Wang

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate between preanalytical, analytical and post-analytical error
  • Have a framework for structuring answers
  • Have a basic understanding of laboratory resource utilization and validation

An overview of the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical errors that can be inherent within erroneous test results. A brief overview of equipment acquisition, validation and maintenance.

A brief review of issues in laboratory utilization.

GP Scenerios

Wednesday January 13, 1615-1715

Dr.Russel Price

Dr.Allam Shawwa

Dr. Linda Kocovski

Dr.Robbie Wang

Objectives:

Infection Control Pearls for the Pathologist

Wednesday January 13, 1830-1930

Dr. Susan Poutanen

Objectives:

Laboratory Management

Wednesday January 13, 1930-2030

Dr.Russel Price

Objectives:


Gross Pathology (How to Recognize and Make the Diagnosis)

Thursday January 14, 1010-1110

Dr. Michelle Downes

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and approach gross specimens
  • Describe common gross abnormalities
  • Develop differential diagnosis

The session covers several high yield topics in medical biochemistry. The target audience would be general pathology residents who are through the biochemistry rotations and prior writing the Royal college exams. The session will be of value to all pathology residents or practicing pathologists who are setting their career goal as a general laboratory physician or medical laboratory director in community hospitals in the future.

The RCPSC AP Exam – Format, General Information and How to Perform at Your Best

Thursday January 14, 1110-1150

Dr. Heidi Sapp

Objectives:

Pancreatic Pathology Selected Topics

Thursday January 14, 1150-1220

Dr.Heidi Sapp

Objectives:

Gastrointestinal Pathology: Snapshot Review Of Relevant Topics For An Emerging Pathologist

Thursday January 14, 1320-1440

Dr. David Schaeffer

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List different types of esophagitis, gastritis, duodenitis and colitis and discuss how to distinguish among entities within these differential diagnoses

Cardiovascular Surgical and Autopsy Pathology – An Overview

Thursday January 14, 1500-1550

Dr. Mathieu Castonguay

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize common causes of sudden cardiac death
  • Distinguish major subtypes of cardiomyopathy
  • Describe common causes of cardiac valvular dysfunction, and selected associations
  • Provide a histopathologic classification of vasculitis
  • Compare common cardiac tumours

This presentation will review a variety of cardiovascular pathology topics, in preparation for the RCPSC examination and for routine autopsy and surgical pathology practice.

Thoracic Pathology Review

Thursday January 14, 1550-1650

Dr. David Hwang

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Differentiate the common subtypes of lung carcinomas according to the 2015 WHO classification
  • Identify the most common types of interstitial lung disease
  • Have an approach to diagnosing suspicious pleural lesions
  • Discuss the differential diagnosis of anterior mediastinal tumours

This session will provide an overview of key issues in lung, pleural, and mediastinal pathology.

Forensic Pathology for the Senior Resident

Thursday January 14, 1710-1825

Dr. Edward Tweedie

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe methods of identifying deceased persons
  • Recognize common artefactual postmortem changes.
  • Recognize injuries due to blunt trauma, sharp force trauma, firearms, fire.
  • Identifying causes of sudden natural death based on gross findings at autopsy.
  • Explain when and how to obtain samples for toxicological analysis

This will be a presentation of images of typical autopsy findings pertinent to: – Identification – Postmortem changes – Asphyxial deaths – Drowning – Hypothermia – Blunt force injury – Pedestrain/motor vehicle deaths – Craniocerebral trauma – Sharp force injury – Drugs and alcohol – Firearms – Electrocution – Fire deaths – Child abuse/ elder abuse – Natural disease in death investigation.

Selected Entities in Head and Neck Pathology

Thursday January 14, 1930-2030

Dr. Martin Hyrcza

Objectives:


Quality Assurance in Immunohistochemistry

Friday January 15, 1010-1055

Dr. Kelly Dakin-Hache

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List variables that influence the results of immunohistochemical tests
  • Understand the selection of normal tissue controls
  • Identify specific recommendations for use of positive and negative control tissues
  • Understand principles of test calibrations and validation
  • Recognize importance of external quality control

Various aspects of the immunohistochemical test and quality assurance are reviewed.

Orthopedic Pathology

Friday January 15, 1055-1215

Dr. Kelly Dakin-Hache

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • List histological and immunohistochemical features of soft tissue tumors
  • List histological and immunohistochemical features of bone tumors
  • Discuss grading and staging of bone and soft tissue tumors
  • List entities with associated tumor syndromes
  • Identify tumors with recurrent genetic abnormalities (translocations)

This lecture reviews classification, grading, and staging of bone and soft tissue tumors. Non-neoplastic bone disease is also discussed..

Breast Pathology

Friday January 15, 1315-1430

Dr. Gillian Bethune

Objectives:

Neuropathology

Friday January 15, 1430-1545

Dr. Namita Sinha

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • To recognize the important anatomical structures and landmarks in brain and spinal cord
  • differential diagnosis based on patient’s age/tumors location and correlate their differential with frozen section diagnosis
  • Recognize basic developmental malformations, vascular malformation, causes of intracerebral hemorrhage, toxic effects of the CO/methanol poisoning, metabolic abnormalities, pathologic findings and common CNS infections, demyelinating disease.
  • Diagnose and grade common brain/SC tumors

Presentation will give a brief introduction to anatomy. There will be molecular updates in CNS tumors specified in 2016 WHO Classification of Brain Tumors. It will outline various CNS entities with few examples including infectious, inflammatory, neoplastic, neurodegenerative and other CNS pathologies. It will show the precautionary measures that are taken on lethal infectious autopsy cases like Prion disease. There will be some slides on how to approach muscle and nerve cases, with examples.

Application of Molecular Pathology in Solid and Liquid Tumours

Friday January 15, 1600-1715

Dr. Stephen Yip

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe application of molecular diagnostics in clinical pathology

Review basic principals of molecular diagnostics including pre-analyitical variables as well as indication and basic interpretation..

Pathology Of The Gynecologic Tract

Friday January 15, 1715-1830

Dr. Bojana Djordjevic

Objectives:

  • Outline the pathogenesis ofof common neoplastic diseases of the female genital tract
  • Summarize the key histologic features of newly described entities and understand emerging concepts in gynecologic pathology

This lecture is an overview of well-established and emerging entities and concepts in gynecologic pathology that should comprise the knowledge base of senior residents in gynecologic pathology.

Pediatric and Perinatal Pathology

Friday January 15, 1930-2045

Dr. Chelsea Maedler-Kron

Objectives:


Cytology – Review of the Basic Principles

Saturday January 16, 1000-1115

Dr. Joerg Schwock

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Use appropriate resources to adequately prepare for the Cytology section of the RCPSC exam
  • Demonstrate an up-to-date diagnostic knowledge in cytopathology
  • Demonstrate knowledge of quality assurance and improvement principles in cytology

Cytopathology is often the first and on occasion the only available method for morphological assessment of a disease manifest (e.g. lung mass) or subclinical disease process (e.g. Papanicolaou test). Clinical patient management relies heavily on the information gleaned from often quantitatively small samples. Ancillary studies to obtain prognostic and predictive data have increasingly become an integral part of modern cytopathology practice and are often clinically expected as an inseparable part of diagnostic reporting. The accuracy of the disease classification/specific cytopathological diagnosis depends chiefly on (1) the quality of the sample (including technical specimen preparation), (2) the proficiency of the pathologist who is tasked with the morphological evaluation, (3) the integration of clinical information, and -finally- (4) the generation of a clinically meaningful and actionable report. To facilitate preparation for the final milestone of residency training in Canada, this session is intended to equip the participants with the necessary resources in order to quickly and effectively recapitulate already acquired knowledge and gain (or re-gain) confidence in the interpretation of cytological preparations. The session will also focus on potential sources of diagnostic errors and sources of misinterpretation with suggestions on how these can be avoided both in the exam setting as well as in clinical practice. The information provided is primarily intended for trainees in their final years of training in Anatomical and General Pathology prior to the RCPSC certification examination

Skin Pathology

Saturday January 16, 1115-1230

Dr. Shachar Sade

Objectives:

Practical Overview of Prostate, Kidney, Bladder and Testicular Tumour Pathology

Saturday January 16, 1330-1445

Dr.Trevor Flood

Objectives:

Quality Assurance in Surgical Pathology

Saturday January 16, 1500-1600

Dr. Henrike Rees

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the basic elements of quality assurance
  • Describe the stages of test cycle monitoring
  • Name ADASP recommendations for quality assurance
  • Name the Canadian QA guidelines for interpretative pathology
  • Develop an organized approach to practical quality and patient safety issues pertaining to surgical and cytopathology

Review of the terminology used in QA, the quality measures used in surgical pathology, communication strategies and challenges, ADASP recommendations and Pan Canadian QA guidelines, provide examples of a variety of scenarios to demonstrate an organized approach to practical and common QA and patient safety issues in surgical and/or cytopathology

Liver Pathology

Saturday January 16, 1600-1700

Dr. Sandra Fischer

Objectives:

Kidney Pathology

Saturday January 16, 1500-1600

Dr. Henrike Rees

Objectives:


Practical Approach to Hematological Evaluation of Peripheral Blood

Sunday January 17, 1000-1045

Dr. Allam Shawwa

Objectives:

Flow Cytometry in the Evaluation of Hematopoiesis and Hematological Neoplasms

Sunday January 17, 1045-1145

Dr. Graeme Quest

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Assess the quality of flow cytometry data and gating
  • Recognize normal immunophenotypic patterns in hematolymphoid populations
  • Recognize classical aberrant immunophenotypes and their disease associations

Flow cytometry is a powerful tool for assessing hematolymphoid populations – but with great power comes great responsibility! This sessions will begin with a review the principles of flow cytometry with attention to assessing the quality of data and gating, build in assessment of normal hematolymphoid populations, and then review some classic aberrant immunophenotypes and their disease associations.

A Overview Of Negotiation As Well As Financial, Inusrance And Tax Planning For The Pathologist And Pathologist-in Training

Sunday January 17, 1145-1300

Dr. Brian Cummings

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the need and benefit of a professional advisory team
  • Discuss the remuneration and working conditions for a Pathologist across Canada
  • Utilize negotiation skills to optimize a potential opportunity
  • discuss the importance of it’s “not what you make it’s what you keep”

A brief overview of Pathologist’s working condition and remuneration as well as a discussion of negotiation skills to maximize an opportunity. Further, insight into the financial insurance and tax opportunities and pitfalls for a Pathologist as well as the importance of a professional advisory team and resources available for those in training and in practice.

Approach to Work-up and Diagnosis of Lymphoproliferative Disorders

Sunday January 17, 1300-1415

Dr. Etienne Mahe

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the broad classes of lymphoproliferative disorders, with deference to the WHO Classification of Lymphomas
  • Describe the basic morphological patterns characteristic of the most common lymphoproliferative disorders
  • Outline an algorithmic approach to the immunophenotypic work-up of lymphoproliferative disorders
  • Describe the diagnostic and prognostic implications of important biomarkers, including molecular genetic biomarkers
  • Summarize the basic clinical features of lymphoproliferative disorders, the basic treatment approaches, and how specific diagnostic features inform prognosis and therapy

The biology and classification of hematolymphoid entities is highly complex, raising challenges for residents and practicing pathologists not routinely faced with a depth and breadth of experience in this area. The aim of this session is to present a simplified approach to the vast spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders (focusing on the neoplastic entities), with care to highlight recent changes to the WHO classification. This session will review the basic morphological patterns of the most common entities, with a focus on formulating an approach to ancillary studies based on differential morphological features.Given the vast array of ancillary studies available in hematological pathology, this session will distill the most appropriate ancillary resources required to derive a diagnosis and subclassification. Throughout, the session will aim to highlight important clinical features and how other non-IHC/molecular laboratory studies may inform a diagnostic work-up. Important biomarkers will be highlighted, including cytogenetic and molecular biomarkers. Finally, the session will aim to highlight how specific subclassification is relevant from the clinical perspective, especially to inform therapeutic options. This session will be of value to pathology residents and general & anatomical pathologists.

Laboratory Coagulation: Overview for the Practicing Pathologist

Sunday January 17, 1430-1530

Dr. Rita Selby

Objectives:

Transfusion Reaction Essentials for Laboratory Medical Directors

Sunday January 17, 1530-1630

Dr. Rita Selby

Objectives:

Residents Review Course Hematopathology Program – Friday January 15 to Sunday January 17 (All Times Eastern Time Zone) 
Note that Sunday Program is with AP/GP Group